Mayberry1

 QUIRKS

Mayberry, Mayberry, Mayberry  

The Andy Griffith Show ran from 1960-1968 on CBS followed by a spinoff, Mayberry RFD, that continued the misadventures of some Mayberry citizens – without Andy Griffith – until 1971. Although a fictional town, Mayberry hasn’t been forgotten. Mayberry fans have made their way to  the small town of Mount Airy, North Carolina, Andy Griffith’s real-life birth place, to celebrate Mayberry Days annually for the last 26 years. This year’s festival was held at the end of September with special guests that included Betty Lynn (Thelma Lou), Clint Howard (Leon), Barbara Eden (Ellen Brown), and Ronnie Schell (Jim Martin / Bernie the furrier/Duke Slater in Gomer Pyle) among others. Also on hand were tribute actors such as Kenneth Junkin who has been portraying Otis Campbell, the affable Mayberry town drunk, for almost 20 years.

More trivia about the Andy Griffith show.

Why did Andy have his pant leg stuck in his shoe on the TV show?

How many times did he fire his gun on the show?

Find out the answers on imayberry.com right after reading an article that I wrote for the Huntsville Times on a Floyd the Barber tribute actor that is still hanging out in cyberspace. Hope you enjoyed this trip down memory lane (for those of us old enough to remember).

Slueth

MYSTERIES

Small Town Murder Mysteries 

Real or Fiction (Click on the link to find out)

A fire is set to cover up the brutal murder of a handsome athletic couple with no known enemies in the little town of Paris, Illinois.

Murder and a suitcase full of stolen money in Belfry, Maine.

Mysterious “Evil Clowns” are seen roaming the streets of Wasco, California.

A caretaker is found dead in a barn of a riding stable in a small town off of the Florida Coast.

Humpty

Project Humpty Dumpty

If you are in Hays County, Texas and you find yourself discussing Project Humpty Dumpty or Project Endurance, you aren’t talking about the next great invention, the research into a new drug, or a new child’s game? Instead, according to the Hays Free Press, you would be talking about an economic development in the town of San Marcos, Texas (estimated 2014 population of approximately 58,000). The use of pseudonyms to refer to economic development in Hays County government deliberations is legal and common. The public finds out all the details when the matter is settled. While transparency in government is still important, pseudonyms are valuable to keep the process flowing without a lot of public involvement or uproar, particularly when it involves complicated and expensive business deals.

PianoCreativity in Small Towns and Rural Counties

Almost all ‘creative’ people live in the hustle and bustle of large metropolitan areas is obviously not true, but how do you quantify where creativity does and does not reside. The Department of Agriculture classifies people by their employment in creative class occupations or creative class codes. This classification indicates a county’s share of population employed in occupations that require “thinking creatively,” according to the USDA. Creative class occupations are a group of approximately 93 occupation classifications ranging from scientists, to business executives, to artists.  In the data shown below, almost 1/3 (28%) of those counties that ranked in the top quarter in employment in creative class occupations are considered non-metro. Non-metro is defined by Rural-Urban Continuum Codes that distinguish metropolitan (metro) counties by the population size of their metro area, and nonmetropolitan (nonmetro) counties by degree of urbanization and adjacency to a metro area or areas. The 2003 Rural-Urban continuum code scheme includes 1,089 metro counties and 2,052 nonmetro.map

One thought on “Mayberry, Murder, and Creativity

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